Where are they now: Angie Chua of bobo design studio

Angie Photo

Bobo Logo1.jpg

 

Are you wondering what happens to my Brick House Branding alumni post-graduation? What they do with the momentum and new-found knowledge? Curious about where they take their businesses in the year following all that hard work?

 

I’m back with another installment in my “Where Are They Now?” series and I’m doing-cartwheels-excited to show you the serious waves my BHB graduates are making!

 

Angie Photo

 

SAY HELLO TO ANGIE OF BOBO DESIGN STUDIO

You might recognize Angie from Team Lucky Break.  But before Angie was a part of my team, she was a client and a BHB graduate. I’ve been uber impressed with her since I first met her at Craftcation, and watching her grow her brand has given me many a proud mama moment. Cheers, Angie!

 

 

Lucky Break: Why and when did you originally launch your company?

Angie: I launched bobo in 2008 making handcrafted makeup bags. I was working at a pharma startup that ended up closing its doors during the economic downturn of 2009. Unsure of what my next job was going to be, I began putting more effort into bobo. I had grand dreams to turn it into something, but looking back, it was definitely a hobby at best.

 

Shortly after losing my pharma job, I started my career in brand advertising, and that consumed my life until 2017 when I decided to give bobo the college effort I always dreamed of.  So while I started in 2008, I really consider 2017 the start of my company.

 

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bobo design studio, BEFORE Brick House Branding

 

 

Lucky Break: At what point did you know it was time for a rebrand?

Angie: I always joke that I had been a “long time stalker turned client,” but it’s true!  I had been following Lela and her work for a while.

 

The second I quit my job, I threw down coin to work with Lela in BHB because I needed her to blow down this house so I could build it up again properly.  I figured that I had the disposable cash at the time and thought I should tap in the help early instead of waiting till I’ve made every mistake and then trying to scramble the funds together to get that lifeline from her.  So the decision to rebrand wasn’t even really about the rebrand itself, it was about utilizing Lela’s resources while I had the financial wiggle room to do so and set the foundation for my business.

 

 

Lucky Break: Please share a significant realization about the brand development process that you discovered while in Brick House Branding.

Angie: I knew BHB was going to be challenging work. This wasn’t the first time I had  seen a “build your target customer worksheet” or read about branding. What I did not expect was how much of an emotional process BHB was going to be. This is where Lela really shines.

 

She helped me build a deep connection to my brand and my work in a way that transformed everything for me- how I view my products, how I think about my brand, how I talk about my brand, how I create content, and how I want others to view and experience it.

 

 

bobo design studio, AFTER Brick House Branding

bobo design studio, AFTER Brick House Branding

 

 

Lucky Break: What professionals did you tag in to help with the process, and what pieces of the branding puzzle did you DIY? 

Angie: I had joined some online groups, “masterminds” so to speak, and taken one “target customer” online course.  While the info I learned was useful, it was all very “cookie cutter.”

 

Nothing was groundbreaking. Nothing was actually focused on my business, and it was information that could be easily found googled from a blog post somewhere on the internet. I knew Lela was the real deal, so I didn’t spend too much effort searching the web for SEO friendly blog posts by people who were not authoritative in the space.

 

 

Lucky Break: What was the biggest obstacle you encountered during the rebranding process?

Angie: The biggest obstacle was nailing down the essence of my brand in a way that felt authentic, not just to me, but to my customers. I have ADHD, and I tend to be all over the place creatively (and in life), but finally ironing out my “core” helped me reign in the ideas, edit my products, and made the creation process more straightforward.

 

bobo design studio's Instagram feed, before + after Brick House Branding

bobo design studio’s Instagram feed, before (left) + after (right)  Brick House Branding

 

 

Lucky Break: How has your own perception of your brand evolved since graduating from Brick House Branding?

Angie: It is night and day. My brand is growing in ways that I can only attribute to Lela and BHB. Before BHB, I had no direction. I walked into fabric stores and walked up and down the aisle to see what prints spoke to me. I’d spend so much on prints that I’d bring home and never end up using.  I was waiting for the fabric to speak to me to generate inspiration. It’s very much an artist’s way of thinking.

 

Now, I think like a brand instead of an artist.  I think about my customer, where they are going, what colors and patterns they gravitate to, what complimentary goods provide value to their life? That fuels my decision-making process, and in the end, I create a more cohesive collection of goods that speak to them (and me!)

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Lucky Break: Are your products are being received differently by others since the rebrand? How has their reaction evolved?

Angie: 100%.  People used to love my bright prints, not because of what bobo meant to them. My bags acted as great gifts; purchased by someone needing a unique gift in a pinch.  It almost was a placeholder for something of meaning. My goods didn’t end up with someone who drew a connection to what I created.  In the end, it didn’t have any real intrinsic value to the person who was buying my bags or the person receiving it.

 

But once I re-branded, I began to see repeat customers. I saw people who tagged me in photos using my bags when they traveled (which is in the context of my brand- Wanderlust goods), they began to see themselves in the brand and built loyalty to my products.

 

 

bobo design studio, AFTER Brick House Branding

bobo design studio, AFTER Brick House Branding

 

 

Lucky Break: Can you share a recent win that you’ve realized because of the rebrand?

Angie: I have two significant ones-

  1. I was asked to be a part of this branding case study! I think in my final survey for BHB, I said a goal of mine was to be a “before and after” case study! Ta Da!
  2. When one of my favorite organizations, Dear Handmade Life said they wanted to do a blog post and feature me on a podcast revolving around the evolution of my brand, how I handle social media as it pertains to my branding, and how I stay authentic to my business.

 

Sometimes branding is the work that people don’t see and takes the most effort behind the scenes. To have someone else externally take note, and acknowledge the intangible parts of the business that I’ve poured my heart and soul into- it’s so validating, not just for me as a person, but for the investment in working with Lela.

 

 

Lucky Break: How did Brick House Branding experience help shape your branding process?

Angie: BHB taught me to narrow my focus and hone in on a niche. Strangely the opposite result occurred- it gave me more creative freedom to create relevant products and gave me permission to make product decisions that would or would not ultimately serve my customer.

 

bobo design studio, AFTER Brick House Branding

bobo design studio, AFTER Brick House Branding

 

 

Lucky Break: What do you wish you had known at the beginning of the brand development process? What advice would you give to someone who’s getting ready to start the brand development process?

Angie: If I could go back in a time machine and give myself some advice, it would be to sign up for this sooner. It’s never too early to think about branding. It will only save money, pain, and emotional heartache by tapping someone in as early as possible.

 

Investing in branding is not dependent on how far along you are or how big of a brand you are- it’s about investing in building a proper foundation. It’s about how well you understand what it is you do, the value you bring, the visual and verbal communication of that value, and understanding your customer on a deep level.  It’s about valuing your business enough to invest in it, and take it seriously.

 

Thanks for catching up with us, Angie. We can’ t wait to see what comes next for you and bobo design studio… We’re cheering you on!

 

If you’d like to build a stronger, smart brand in 2019, then I hope that you’ll consider joining me in the winter semester of Brick House Branding. This 9-week brand development mentorship dissects awesome brands and then helps you build your own, brick by brick, with me working right alongside you to cheer you on and ensure that you’re on the right track. Enrollment opens on October 2!

 

PAGING ATLANTA-AREA PHOTOGRAPHERS!

Serenbe1

I’m in need of an Atlanta area photographer for a one-day shoot in the famed Serenbe community just south of Atlanta. Here are the details…

 

 

WHEN: A one-day shoot on October 24 or 25, 2018.

 

WHERE: The uber-gorgeous penthouse of the Textile Lofts at Serenbe. My team will be staying in that same apartment for our annual retreat. We plan to shoot inside and outside on the private rooftop, and potentially at other spots within Serenbe. This often-photographed community is 35 minutes south of Atlanta.

 

WHO: I’m a business strategist that helps creative, product-based companies dive deeper into their brand development, price their products more strategically, and get them onto store shelves. I work with jewelers, stationery designers, artisan soap + candle makers, ceramicists, apparel designers, etc.

 

WHY: My small-but mighty team of 4 will be publishing a new website soon and we need some fresh imagery! I envision individual headshots, and shots of us gathered around a table, huddled over a computer screen, stuffing our mouths with doughnuts (we’re really good at that!), etc.

 

 

If you’re interested and available on those dates, then I invite you to send us a message with a link to your portfolio!

 

 

Where are they now: Harmony Todd of Old Soul Artisan

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OldSoulArtisan_Logo

 

Are you wondering what happens to my Brick House Branding alumni post-graduation? What they do with the momentum and new-found knowledge? Curious about where they take their businesses in the year following all that hard work?

 

I’m back with another installment in my “Where Are They Now?” series and I’m doing-cartwheels-excited to show you the serious waves my BHB graduates are making!

 

HarmonyTodd

 

Say hello to Harmony of Old Soul Artisan

 

I’m thrilled to kick off this round of catching up with my Brick House Branding graduates with Harmony Todd of Old Soul Artisan. After digging deep in Brick House Branding, Harmony fully embraced her brand’s dark side + emerged with a beautiful, focused brand. Welcome, Harmony! We’re so glad to have you here.

 

Lucky Break:  Why and when did you originally launch your company?

Harmony: I launched Old Soul Artisan in September 2014. I had just finished graduate school and spent the summer evaluating career options that had at one time seemed logical but were now surfacing questions about whether any of them would lead me to the life I wished to have. The cure to some of this anxiety came in the form of creativity by resuming an old hobby I had of making candles. The beginnings of my company were similar to many makers: I made candles for fun, gave them to friends, someone mentioned I should start selling them, and so I did! Within a few weeks I had created a small product line, designed simple labels that I printed at home, and got a booth at the local farmers market.

 

 

Lucky Break:  At what point did you know it was time for a rebrand?

Harmony: By early 2017 I had been in business for a few years and had grown a small following of customers and a handful of wholesale accounts. My business was growing, but very slowly. I was struggling with the feeling of working all the time and some weeks having very little to show for it in my bank account. Most of my sales were from repeat customers. While that let me know I had a great product, I realized I had a problem attracting new customers or new stockists. I felt like I was just spinning my wheels and that my marketing and brand messaging must have been so disconnected that my brand wasn’t able to stand out.

 

Lavender4oz

Old Soul Artisan packaging and logo, BEFORE Brick House Branding and a rebrand.

 

Lucky Break:  Please share a significant realization about the brand development process that you discovered while in Brick House Branding.

Harmony: The most significant realization is that I needed to niche way down. Lela said something to the effect of “when you try to speak to everyone, you speak to no one.” The exercises in Brick House Branding led me to visualize the company I wanted to build. I realized I needed to put more of my own artistic flair into it. It dawned on me that I had given up a career for the pursuit of creative freedom and that my company had not been reflecting the creativity I had bottled up inside of me. BHB helped me infuse this creativity with a brand story that targeted a niche market and the result has been a company that is more genuine and unique.

 

 

Lucky Break: What professionals did you tag in to help with the process, and what pieces of the branding puzzle did you DIY? 

Harmony: I manufacture all my items, so everything from scent development to pouring and labeling candles is done in-house. Additionally, I built my own website on Shopify, wrote all the new copy, and designed my wholesale line sheet.

 

However, trying to DIY everything was one reason I had found myself in the position I was in, so I tagged in several professionals for help. I hired a wonderful graphic designer who was also a photographer that had experience with other brands with a darker aesthetic so I knew she would understand the look I was going for. She helped bring my vision to life by updating my logo and designing new product labels and marketing materials. After having my labels professionally printed (which look much better than anything I could have printed at home), I shipped my items to my designer to have them photographed. The investment was worth it. Not only do my items have a much more professional and sophisticated presentation, but outsourcing this work saved me a lot of time and stress that these tasks used to create.

 

OldSoulArtisan-Purification-4ozsoycandle (2)

Old Soul Artisan packaging and logo, AFTER Brick House Branding and a rebrand.

 

 

Lucky Break: What was the biggest obstacle you encountered during the rebranding process?

Harmony: The biggest obstacle was learning that everything takes longer than you expect it to. In the end, everything worked out and I was able to launch the new branding on time but it was a big lesson learned in project planning for the future. The biggest problem I ran into was with my printer. I expected to have my labels printed in two weeks but it ended up taking about six weeks because they weren’t color matching correctly. I ended up having to change label paper due to this but it actually turned into a positive outcome since the textured paper enhanced the leather-bound book cover design of my labels.

 

 

Lucky Break:  How has your own perception of your brand evolved since graduating from Brick House Branding?  

Harmony: It has changed a lot! Before the rebrand I was directing everyone to my Etsy store. My photos were OK but certainly not professional. There was always a voice in my head that said “in the future…”. In the future, I will have a website or better photography or this or that. There were always things that I was unhappy with, most of it because I tried to DIY everything that I simply didn’t have the talent for. After finishing Brick House Branding I now feel much more empowered to get out there and talk about my company, and with the additional information learned in LBU feel ready to pitch retailers with confidence.

 

 

Lucky Break:  Are your products are being received differently by others since the rebrand? How has their reaction evolved?

Harmony: The reaction was amazing! When I launched the new branding (and website) I received great feedback about it. My customers loved the new direction of the company. A cohesive brand story is incredibly important and my customers could immediately identify exactly how much work went into this rebrand. The products are basically the same but the new presentation and storytelling that has been interwoven into each of the scent descriptions has been an exciting change to my customers. I’ve also begun to see more press and retailer notice that I imagine will only help my company to continue to grow.

 

 

Lucky Break: Can you share a recent win that you’ve realized because of the rebrand? 

Harmony: Even though I’ve been in business for four years now, there has always been some nagging thought in my head questioning the sustainability of my business and its potential for growth. Due to the positive reaction to the rebrand I finally feel like, “Yeah, I can make this entrepreneur thing work!”

 

OldSoulArtisan-9ozSoyCandle-Ritual (4)

Old Soul Artisan packaging and logo, AFTER Brick House Branding and a rebrand.

 

 

Lucky Break: How did Brick House Branding experience help shape your branding process?

Harmony: It simply wouldn’t have been possible without BHB. Lela asked all the right questions that got me thinking about things in an entirely new light. Without the trainings, worksheets, feedback, and coaching calls I would have never been able to get my brand story as cohesive as it is now. Hiring Lucky Break Consulting was the best professional development investment I’ve ever made.

 

 

Lucky Break:  What do you wish you had known at the beginning of the brand development process? What advice would you give to someone who’s getting ready to start the brand development process?

Harmony: You have got to go into this with an open mind and be willing to objectively analyze your business. You need to be prepared to change things you may not have expected to when you started the process and also be willing to invest in upgrading things like photography and packaging. My rebranding experience required a lot of soul searching. It was hard work but absolutely worth it.

 

Be patient and expect there to be delays in the launch timeline. Rebranding can be a massive project. There can be hiccups along the way, especially when you tag in other professionals to help. It took me 14 months to finish the rebrand.  Please be gentle with yourself and keep generous amounts of wiggle room in your project timeline.

 

Finally, enjoy the process! You will learn a lot about yourself and your business along the way.

 

Thanks for catching up with us, Harmony. We can’ t wait to see what comes next for you and Old Soul Artisan… We’re cheering you on!

 

If you’d like to build a stronger, smart brand in 2019, then I hope that you’ll consider joining me in the winter semester of Brick House Branding. This 9-week brand development mentorship dissects awesome brands and then helps you build your own, brick by brick, with me working right alongside you to cheer you on and ensure that you’re on the right track. Enrollment opens on October 2!

 

 

#LBCWantsToKnow >> August 2018: Wholesale

LuckyBreak-LBCWantsToKnow-Wholesale

#LBCWantsToKnow Wholesale

 

Each month, I ask my Instagram community to join me in a focused, crowd-sourced discussion on a specific subject.  For the month of August, we rolled up our sleeves to chat about wholesale. If you’re serious about getting a foot in the door with shops for the all-important holiday season, then August is the month to make that happen!

 

What’s the one thing about wholesale that you wish you’d known when you started?

THE LUCKY BREAK COMMUNITY SAID: 

whitneymanney: Net terms

 

bathedinglaze: The true cost of obtaining a retail customer versus wholesale customer.

 

mamasudsllc: How much I needed to raise my prices to make 💰

 

rockcreeksoaps: How important it is to build a relationship with my wholesale accounts and maintaining good contact and follow up with them. Also never be afraid to contact an account, they get busy, and won’t remember to order until it’s too late, and then they might shop around instead of stocking with you again!

 

standardwax: How hard it is to be nimble or make changes when you have 300 buyers counting on your consistency!

 

sassypantsdesign: Uhhh, Lucky Break! 👍💓🙏🏻🙌

 

MY THOUGHTS: These are some juuuuicy answers that had me nodding my head! I’ll weigh in quickly on each one.

 

  • Net terms can be immensely tricky for newer makers, and I’ve learned that 90% of problems can be prevented on the front end by communicating professionalism, having strong systems in place, and not shying away from things like checking references before extending credit and sending payment reminders when the due date passes. Many of us are uncomfortable with money discussions, but I’ve found that buyers follow the tone we set and we need to start of on strong footing… much easier than trying to prepare things on the back end. Also, not every brand owner is in a position to offer trade credit, though buyers love those who can!

 

  • The cost of obtaining a retail customer is generally higher than that of obtaining a wholesale customer, and the lifetime value (total dollars spent) by a wholesale customer is much, much higher. This is an often overlooked facet when clients ask me why on earth they’d sell their wares at “half the normal cost.” The fact is, selling at wholesale produces efficiencies in creation and shipment that drive costs lower, which means that it cost less to make and ship a wholesale product versus the same product sold at retail. So while you are selling at “half” ($24 retail, versus $12 wholesale), your profits aren’t exactly halved. Add in the higher customer acquisition cost and lower lifetime value of a retail customer, and wholesale looks more and more attractive.

 

  • It’s true that selling in wholesale means that you need to know your costs intimately. While you might be able to eek by in direct-to-consumer channels without knowing where every penny goes, wholesale won’t provide you that luxury. Lucky Break clients frequently engage me to help further their brand development and raise the bar on their visual presentation, increasing the quality of their value communication in the process.  The end result? You can charge more for your products and put wholesale within reach.

 

  • Wholesale buyers often tell me that we pursue them like lovers until we get that first order, then we vanish like ghosts. Regular followup is *essential*, which is why I recommend both group communication (vis a vis a quarterly wholesale email campaign) and individual communication (emailing the account individually to check on stock and see how you can help). Getting that first order is hard, but the second and third orders should be much, much easier. Don’t ghost your buyers and allow those accounts to shrivel. You’ve worked hard to get the seed into the ground, and regular watering will yield big results!

 

  • There’s an important pivot that happens when transitioning from hobby-business to business-business. The primary focus shifts from the making to the marketing and production, which can catch many product designers off guard. It’s awesome to have a robust lineup of stores carrying your work, but that also means that speed boat turns evolve into cruise ship turns, making change slower and more laborious. I think that’s why it’s so incredibly important to ensure that you’ve designed scale-able products, priced them correctly, and packaged them smartly from the get-go, though some evolution is expected and a natural part of business life.

 

 

What methods do you use to collect wholesale orders?
What do you love or loathe about them?

THE LUCKY BREAK COMMUNITY SAID: 

soymuchbrighter@shopstockabl + my own standalone website 👍🏻

 

shopjanery: Since we’re a pet bed company, we use highly trained dogs to retrieve and deliver orders. Just kidding. 😁 I built a private portal within my Shopify site, using Locksmith to take online orders. However, I also accept orders by email, phone, order form, you name it. If they meet my minimums, I’ll take their order in whatever way is easiest for them!

 

saltwater_design: Order form, but most end up just emailing. I guess it’s one less step for them!

 

charliemadisonoriginals: I accept them by email. I’ve been struggling with figuring out a different option but haven’t found the perfect solution yet😉. I love @shopjanery’s Locksmith idea – I’ve been considering that too!

 

gavinluxe: Via email

 

sassypantsdesign: I’ve used order forms (various kinds, from simple to interactive) but most seem to prefer email, which is fine with me. My dream is to implement a separate wholesale ordering section on my website. It’s in the plans, after I get a mountain of other things done.

 

bougiequaintrelle: Website, email, or phone.

 

halfpintnaturals: I’m looking up Locksmith stat. I have a form that one shop uses out of the lot of them. Most email and call.

 

normalsoap: We currently get orders by email but would love a website as a part of Shopify for our customers to order directly from!

 

soapymomma: We take wholesale orders by phone, email, and through our website. After Etsy wholesale closed we added an app to the website that allows us to tag a customer as wholesale so that wholesale pricing is offered after our stockists have set up a wholesale account with us.

 

olivemyskin: Any way I can get them! What works best for all has been sending a blank order form with orders, then they fill it out for their next order, scan or take a phot and email to me. Working on a wholesale portal on the website. I don’t like phone orders though. Too much room for error.

 

MY THOUGHTS: I firmly believe that those brands that succeed in wholesale are the brands that make working with them painless and intuitive. That means understanding a buyer’s needs, establishing clear policies, supporting the stockist after the sale, and making the submission of those orders as easy as possible! Here’s a list of my preferred solutions (from most-desired to least)…

 

MOST PREFERABLE: A separate, wholesale-exclusive website with unique logins that you can assign and track. This allows you to tailor the entire experience to the wholesale buyer: displaying wholesale pricing, enabling ordering by the case, scaling shipping fees for larger orders, preventing checkout when cart totals fall below order minimums, previewing new collections before they hit the public eye, and providing a platform for the download of wholesale-specific marketing tools like shelf talkers.

 

An app that enables you to assign regular website users into a group of wholesale buyers. This enables online ordering, though it has its share of limitations. Essentially, you’re retro-fitting a retail site to work for wholesale buyers, as opposed to designing a wholesale experience from the ground up. Wholesale buyers log in to your website to see wholesale pricing.

 

Email. This is a convenient option for buyers that they can use 24 hours a day and it requires minimal investment on the front end from the brand owner. I appreciate that orders are written, which minimizes confusion.  Ideally, you offer a branded order form to buyers who can complete it and return it, further reducing the chance of errors.

 

LEAST PREFERABLE: Phone. Some buyers (especially those who are new to your line) just want to talk it out. If that’s the case, establishing regular office hours will help. If that’s not possible, aim to get back to buyers within 24 hours. In any scenario, it’s wise to summarily that order via email and receive confirmation that it’s correct before you begin production.

 

Each of these methods enables you to harvest orders from wholesale buyers who are already aware of your brand.  But what about those buyers who don’t yet know you exist? That’s where platforms like Faire (formerly Indigo Fair, Stockabl, and Wholesale Matchmaker come in! And I recommend that any brand that’s serious about wholesale invest significant energy into Instagram, as more and more buyers are using that platform to discover new brands.

 

 

Have you ever suffered through a wholesale nightmare?
What did you learn from the experience?

THE LUCKY BREAK COMMUNITY SAID: 

bainamourbath: Had a client that would not pay for weeks and weeks until she was ready to place another order. Would come into my brick and mortar and treat my managers rudely. Needless to say, I sent her a divorce letter that she was not happy about. Although she bought a decent amount of product, sometimes it’s not worth the headache to deal with certain clients. I had to focus on who I wanted representing my brand and she was not it.

 

MY THOUGHTS: Amen and amen! There are some customers who aren’t worth having, and recognizing that is a powerful evolution. But if fifteen years as a full-time business owner have taught me anything, it’s that. I’ve gently dismissed wholesale buyers from my product-based brand (and consulting clients too, for that matter). It’s always a last resort for me, but some opportunities aren’t worth the stress they generate and time they consume. It’s important to have an arsenal of good customer negotiation skills and strategies at the ready and equally important to know when cutting your losses is the best available option.

 

This also hearkens back to something we’ve already touched on in this post: effectively managing trade credit accounts. I’ve learned that customers will get away with exactly what you allow them to get away with, some communicating that you’re a serious professional, establishing expectations, and drawing healthy parameters is key. It’s infinitely more challenging to fix these issues after they arrive than it is to prevent them from happening in the first place! With that in mind, remember that we train people how to treat us. 

 

What strategies do you use to promote your wholesale stockists
+ make them feel like partners?

THE LUCKY BREAK COMMUNITY SAID: 

normalsoap: We try to show them new products when we have them. We try to treat them with free product they can use … and thus fall in love with. Just a few nice things we try to make them feel special. Don’t forget a holiday card thanking them and telling them you look forward to the new year!

 

MY THOUGHTS:Those are some stellar ideas, and there’s no shortage of things that we can do after the sale to help our buyers feel like partners, increasing the chance of reorders and long, fruitful relationships.  Some quick ideas…

 

  • Wholesale-exclusive newsletters delivered at least once per quarter

 

  • Hand-written “thank you” notes tucked into each order

 

  • If you create consumable products (body care, candles, soap, makeup, specialty foods, etc.): Including samples of other products in outbound orders

 

  • Offering marketing tools such a POP displays and shelf talkers to increase sell-through

 

  • Direct contact at least once every 8 weeks to check in on sales and see how you can help

 

  • Remembering your accounts at the holidays with a small gift

 

  • Promoting your wholesale partners via a store directory on your website and through social media “shout out’s”

 

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Be sure to stop by the Lucky Break Instagram, where every month we chat about all things business. I’d love to hear your thoughts and hope you’ll lend your voice. Search the #LBCWantstToKnow hashtag to weigh in! In September, we’re chatting about all things website.

The Lucky Break Calendar – September 2018

Happy September! Did you miss me, kittens? Because I missed you! This summer was spent takin’ care of business … personal business, that is. My gracious boss <wink> granted me some extra time this summer to spend with my family, and while that time was much needed and very much enjoyed, I’m doing-cartwheels-excited to hop back into full-time work mode.

 

September is full of calls with my favorite alumni and soon-to-be alumni Brick House Branding students. Wishing you were one of those BHB students? Enrollment for the first semester of 2019 opens next month on October 2, and I’d love to save a seat for you.

 

Be sure to mark your calendars for September 27 so that you don’t miss my next FB Live biz workshop. I hope to see you then!

 

Whatever you’re working on this month, know that I’m cheering you on!

 

 

Sept 2018