Craftcation 2019 Recap

Craftcation 2019 Recap

Craftcation 2019 Recap

 

Hello there! I’m Angie with team Lucky Break, and I’m jumping in the driver’s seat to share our Craftcation 2019 Recap.

Craftcation 2019 Recap

The Lucky Break Team is a group of remote leading ladies sprinkled across the continental US. A handful of times every year, the LBC team has the opportunity to convene in person.  When we do, we team build, work on projects, and spend time basking in each other’s vibrancy. Craftcation is one of those times, and we aren’t even mad about it.

Craftcation 2019 Recap

Pictured: Angie & Harriet, Lela, Helen, and Chloe.

 

Craftcation 2019 Recap

 

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Meet the Maker: Sarah Villafranco of Osmia Organics

Osmia Organics

I’m excited to share another installment of our ongoing “Meet the Maker” series. We are with Sarah of Osmia Organics and she is revealing morsels of business wisdom and a peek behind her artisan brand. I hope you’re buckled up for this one because Sarah is a powerhouse and her energy is infectious!

 

Meet Sarah Villafranco of Osmia Organics

 

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LBC: What inspired you to take the leap as an entrepreneur?

Sarah: I was feeling uninspired by the practice of emergency medicine, which was a very cool job but did not leave me feeling like I had contributed to people’s long term health in any meaningful way. I had recently lost my mom to cancer and had our second daughter, and I took a class making soap just to shake things up – it worked. I fell in love with the science and art of making soap and skincare and spent a few years developing the line. When it came time to commit and decide whether to start a business, I heard my mother’s voice say “Do what you love, honey,” so I took the leap.

 

LBC: How would you describe what you create?

Sarah: We make organic and natural soap, skincare, bath products, and scents. More importantly, though, we create opportunities and inspiration for people to care for themselves intentionally, weaving small moments of sensory luxury throughout their daily routines. We create a community of people who want to tap into their own power to feel well and joyful. My favorite thing to create is conversations about beauty that go much deeper than surface-level, encouraging people to redefine beauty for themselves, even if that definition includes a few wrinkles or strands of silver hair. And, of course, we create a whole lot of fun.

 

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Lucky Break-April 2019 Calendar

April 2019 Calendar

The Lucky Break April Calendar is here.  You’ve heard the saying, “April showers bring May flowers.” Here at Lucky Break, it is raining cats and dogs with all sorts of happenings.

April 2019 Calendar

Lucky Break April 2019 Calendar

The LBC Team is headed to Ventura, California for Craftcation- a business conference for makers!  It is our absolute favorite event to attend and this year is no different.  Lucky Break Team Member Angie will be teaching her Chalk Lettering Workshop and I’ll be leading a branding workshop as well a salt scrub workshop.

The Think Tank Early Bird Pricing ends on the 5th, so snag yours today!

BHB Open Enrollment begins this month for our Late Summer Semester.  Make sure to grab your seat before this class sells out.

Speaking of branding, make sure to mark your calendars for April 17th, 12:30pm EST as I lead a free Facebook Workshop on branding. Be sure you are following Lucky Break Consulting on Facebook!

Get all the deets by downloading our April Calendar. Use our trackers to help you monitor your metrics, as well as note some focuses for the month.

Make sure you are following along on all we have cooking this February via our mailing list as well as on Instagram! @lelabarker and @luckybreakconsulting

 

April 2019 Calendar

Cosmetic Product Recall Procedure

cosmetic product recall

Do you know how to responsibly execute a cosmetic product recall? There’s been some buzz recently in the clean beauty space after a well-respected, independent brand discovered that one of its most popular formulas isn’t stable. The development hit the airwaves last week, though the product has been beloved by editors and clean beauty fans from coast to coast for several years. The artisan took to their Instagram account and email list to announce that they’re temporarily halting sales while they investigate and reformulate though they stopped short of declaring a recall. I appreciate that this is a teachable moment for our industry, providing an opportunity  to shed some light on the best cosmetic product recall procedure.

 

How to Responsibly Execute a Cosmetic Product Recall

 

cosmetic product recall

 

A graduate of my cosmetic GMP class put the situation on my radar the day after our graduation, and I found the timing ironic. By way of background: I have both a depth of knowledge and an intense passion for the safety of natural cosmetics and ensuring a bright future for those who are pioneering this space. I spent fifteen years bootstrapping my beauty brand, implementing quality control systems, and building GMP-compliant production protocols. And I walked both the halls of Congress and the corridors of the FDA  for several years, working as a small business advocate to encourage government stakeholders to keep small, independent beauty brands in mind as they craft new federal legislation. As a consultant to makers and product designers, I now teach GMP principles to other beauty brand owners.

 

Product recalls are an unfortunate reality of modern consumerism, and product recall examples are abundant. But there’s a particular cosmetic product recall procedure that needs to be followed.

 

MY CONCERNS WITH THE RECENT SCARE FROM A POPULAR INDIE BEAUTY BRAND

There’s a whirlwind of confusion about the requirements for creation and distribution of personal care products within the United States. I engaged in direct dialogue with this beauty entrepreneur during her announcement and our conversation only deepened my concerns.

  • She elected not to use the word “recall” in any of the announcements that I could locate. That’s a critical keyword for this process and clarity is key.
  • The message to customers included romanticized verbiage like “bloom” and “mild fermentation” rather than clear terms which accurately describe what’s happening with those products: mold and contamination. She later conceded privately that she made “some language mistakes.” While my recommendation for an updated statement with clear language apparently fell on deaf ears, I remain hopeful that she’ll make an additional public statement with clear instructions for her customers.
  • When the brand owner addressed my concerns in the comments section of her Instagram post, she mentioned that she’d sold tens of thousands of units of this particular product over the years and affirmed that it “has always challenge tested stable.” She later reached out to me privately and said that the company was “undergoing challenge testing for all of [their] formulas as required by the EU regulatory system.” Those statements are contradictory and lead me to wonder if she understands the nature of these tests and when/why they’re required.
  • When customers inquired on Instagram about whether the product in their possession was safe to use, the company expressed that continued use was “at their discretion.” Both those who hadn’t noticed mold and those who spoke of scraping the mold off the tops of their face mask received that same information. *shudder*  This approach jeopardizes the health of customers while exposing the company to legal liability that’s simply not worth the cost of saving face.

 

BALANCING OUR DESIRE FOR NATURAL BEAUTY WITH THE PUBLIC’S NEED FOR SAFETY

 

Cosmetic Product Recall Procedure

 

Over the past few years, a host of bad actors have invited unwelcome attention and a sense of hysteria about cosmetic safety. I’m looking at you Claire’s, WEN by Chaz Dean, and Brazilian Blowout.

 

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Review of Faire- The Wholesale Marketplace Platform

review of Faire

It’s the platform every maker and buyer is talking about, and I’m here to share my final review of Faire. Over the last few months, I’ve been exploring the Faire wholesale marketplace (formerly Indigo Fair) to help my community determine if they should apply to sell on the platform. The blog series has grown in size and scope as I dug deeper and deeper into the review of Indigo Fair/ Faire and analyzed the pros and cons of this emerging wholesale marketplace.

 

Review of Faire

I’m back with the seventh (!) and final installment of this series to share community reactions and my final thoughts regarding selling on Faire.

 

Faire Final Thoughts_2

 

HOW DO PEOPLE FEEL ABOUT FAIRE?

Over four weeks, I invited both artisans and buyers who had experience with Faire to take part in a survey to collect feedback from this community and measure the results makers see on the platform. I received 91 responses: 83% of those were from artisans, 9% were from retailers, and 8% of respondents both bought and sold on Faire. You’ll note that I’ve summarized the findings of this survey in an infographic at the end of this post.

 

The majority of respondents have been selling on Faire for less than three months (39%). Another 34% have been on the wholesale marketplace for between 3-6 months, and just 3% have been on Faire for eighteen months or more.  I asked those who completed the survey two key questions…

 

  1. On a scale of 1-100, how pleased are you with your experience with Faire? The average answer was 72.
  2. On a scale of 1-100, how would you rate Faire’s responsiveness and customer service? The average score was 79.

 

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I was keenly interested in hearing directly from brand owners about the volume of orders on Faire. The vast majority (47%) receive between 1-4 orders per month. Another 29% of respondents receive between 5-9 orders per month, which means that 76% of all artisans on Faire receive nine orders or less per month. Interestingly, 1% of respondents receive 50+ orders per month!

 

Exactly half of all respondents (50%) received their first order on Faire within one week of going live on the platform.  That’s quite impressive, and it’s easy to see why makers get hooked on Faire/ Indigo Fair so quickly. In total, 88% of Faire sellers closed an order within their first month, and just 2% are still waiting on their first order. That healthy dose of instant gratification makes me wonder if Faire tinkers with their algorithms to quickly deliver orders to new brands for the benefit of “seeding” the relationship.

 

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